Tag Archives: express

SQL Server on Linux: First 30 minutes

They put a ring on it.
They put a ring on it.

What I gushed over a few posts ago has finally happened! SQL Server has a come to Linux (sort of). The database engine is now available as CTP1 and you can get it by adding the repository and running the setup script.

You can follow the walk through for your favorite flavor of Linux, so I won’t repeat that here. it’s really very simple, just a matter of pointing to the correct repository and then apt-get install (Ubuntu). It comes with a setup script that pretty much does all the heavy lifting for you. Keep in mind that this is just for preview so there’s not a lot of options and it sticks everything in a single set of directories (logs/data/tempdb).

I had a small problem when I did the install, but it turned out I just needed to update a few packages. In the event you’re not a Linux person, here’s the easiest way to fix this:

$ sudo apt-get update
$ sudo apt-get upgrade

There’s a lot of stuff to dig into in this release, and as newer versions come out I’ll get more in-depth, but I just wanted to make a quick post about what I did in my first thirty minutes.

Behold in awe my INSERT abilities.
Behold in awe my INSERT abilities.

After the install, I connected via SQLCMD, as there is no SSMS in Linux yet, using the sa and sa password set in the install. I then created a table, dropping a single row into it and then selecting. Not terribly complex stuff.

I took care to try different cases, adding and neglecting brackets ‘[]’ and semicolons. It responded how I expected it to react if I was on a Windows system, which is very reassuring. It’s nice that my T-SQL skills translate seamlessly to the Linux environment, at least internally to SQL Server.

Connected via a my own username.
It doesn’t look or act any different than it I would have if connected to a Windows SQL Server instance.

Next, I put my box ‘U64’ on the network and lo-and-behold I was able to remote into it by its Linux hostname from SSMS 2016 on a Windows machine. No additional setup was required. Microsoft appears to be taking this integration of the Linux and Windows environments seriously.

I then created a SQL login for myself and logged in that way. No issues.

Now, as fun as this was, there’s a whole lot missing. The list includes, but is not limited to:

  • Full-text Search
  • Replication
  • Extended Stored Procedures
  • AD authentication
  • SQL Server Agent
  • SSIS
  • SSAS

This is of course just for CTP1, so a lot of these items will probably show up later. I mean, SQL Server without the SQL Server Agent? That doesn’t even make sense (I’m looking at you Express Edition). There is sort of cascade effect as other items like Maintenance Plans and such that rely on these missing features also being MIA.

The gang's all here!
The gang’s all here!

Also, larger items like Availability groups will also be absent because there’s no Linux analogue for them currently. From what the SQL Server team said in their AMA on reddit they’re toying around with RedHat clustering as a replacement for this in the Linux environment.

The last thing I did before the end of my 30 minutes was to look at the version. As you may or may not know, the Linux version is based on SQL Server vNext, which (as the name implies) is the NEXT version of SQL Server. There was some talk about it being a port of SQL Server 2016, which does not appear to be the case.

SELECT @@VERSION
----------------------------------------------------
Microsoft SQL Server vNext (CTP1) - 14.0.1.246 (X64)
Nov 1 2016 23:24:39
Copyright (c) Microsoft Corporation
on Linux (Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS)

Note that SQL Server 2016 is version 13.0.

And that’s it! As mentioned before I’ll be doing deeper dives into this as time goes on, at the very least with each CTP. But I have to say I’m happy with the results so far. Everything (that was available) worked as I expected it to work. Nice work MS!

-CJ Julius

Creating A Simple Database Inventory Manager with Powershell – Introduction

Which databases names have the letter “B”?

And then we shall rule the world!
And then we shall rule the world!

All DBAs should keep track of their Servers/ Instances/ etc not only for their own edification, but for Management and security reasons as well. If you’re not, then you need to, as it comes in incredibly handy even if it isn’t a requirement of the job.

Most of the time, this information is compiled into a spreadsheet of some kind or possibly in a word processing document somewhere. Keeping this data up-to-date and accurate is a pain, especially when you have to break it out into multiple tabs and/or over multiple documents.

You could get a full-blown inventory manager that collects and compiles all the data and organizes it for you. But there’s a definite cost to that solution and not one that all companies will find useful (Read: “It’s not in the budget this quarter”).

What if you can’t get someone to shell out the money for a product like that? Then you have to either keep with the spreadsheets (yuck) or you need to find another solution with the tools you have.

What’s the Catch?

A simple frontend for your Database Inventory
A simple front-end for your Database Inventory

So, this is my attempt to resolve this issue using two tools that any MSSQL DBA should have: Powershell and SQL Server. I will point to other software products or versions both paid and free below, but the core code should run using things you should already have. That said, here’s my software list:

Required:

Preferred:

Also I will be making a few assumptions:

  1. Your infrastructure security is set up using Active Directory.
  2. Setting up a new instance is already done and you can connect to it.
  3. Your personal login or the login you are using to execute the code is able to query the relevant system tables and server info on each of the target systems.
  4. You know your current Server\Instance setup.
  5. There is no fifth thing.

What You Get

By the time this series is finished you’ll have a simple GUI front-end (shown above) for current data with all of your servers, instances and all the information you could want about them.

We can pull back and organize any data that SQL Server or Windows Server can spit out including, but not limited to:

  • OS Version, Service Pack.
  • SQL Services running, their statuses and logon information.
  • SQL Server Instance names, versions, and editions.
  • SQL Server Database names and sizes.
  • Ability to dynamically re-pull any of this information if needed.

I will walk you through my solution piece by piece over 4 posts (5 including this intro) that will consist of the following parts. This list will be updated with links to the different sections as they are released.

Part I: Building the Repository Database and Tables
Part II: Creating the Repository Stored Procedures
Part III: Coding the Data-Pulling Powershell
Part IV: Putting together the GUI Front-end

Updates:
2016-11-27
Addendum I: Simple Database Inventory Manager 2.1
2017-05-20
Addendum II: Simple Database Inventory Manager 2.3

See you soon in Part I: Building the Repository Database and Tables

–CJ Julius